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20110317
20110317
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KPIX (CBS) 2
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CBS
Mar 17, 2011 3:30pm PDT
. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americans from japan and u.s. officials reminded those staying behind to get out of that 50-mile danger zone around the fukushima dai-ichi plant. the reactors damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami were bombarded today with water mr. from helicopters, police water cannons and fire trucks to try to cool them off and prevent a meltdown, but it's not at all clear if it's working. and in washington, the head of the nuclear regulatory commission said it could take weeks to get these reactors under control. bill whitaker in japan begins our coverage. >> reporter: this new video released today gives the clearest picture yet of the stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. >> what we're seeing is that the damage from the fires is very significant. >> reporter: today, japanese military helicopters with protective led-lined cockpits dumped water on reactor three, attempting to cool the nuclear fuel rods. but much of the water appeared to disperse in the wind. police and firefighters also brought in water cannons to douse the reactor but
CBS
Mar 16, 2011 5:30pm PDT
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2